"The more you trust and rely upon the Spirit,
the greater your capacity to create."

~Dieter F. Uchtdorf

Thursday, May 7, 2009

God Shall Be with You Forever and Ever

This was the theme of my Relief Society lesson this past Sunday. Since several of you have mentioned you liked my quotes and references, I'll share the ones I used this week:

“The Church is not built in one generation. The sound growth of the Church takes hold over three and four generations of faithful Saints. Passing the fortitude of faith to endure to the end from one generation to the next generation is a divine gift of unmeasured blessings to our progeny. Also, we cannot endure to the end alone. It is important that we help by lifting and strengthening one another.” (Robert D Hales, “Behold, We Count Them Happy Which Endure” – Ensign, May 1998)

“Whosoever shall put their trust in God shall be supported in their trials, and their troubles, and their afflictions, and shall be lifted up at the last day” (Alma 36:3).

“Part of enduring well consists of being meek enough, amid our suffering, to learn from our relevant experiences. Rather than simply passing through these things, they must pass through us and do so in ways which sanctify these experiences for our good.” (Neal A Maxwell, “Enduring Well” – Ensign, April 1997)

“Is it possible that in this twilight season of the dispensation of the fulness of times, when Satan and his minions roam the earth inspiring deceit, discouragement, and despair, that we who have been armed with the most potent antidote on earth—the gift of the Holy Ghost—don’t always fully partake of that gift? Are we guilty of spiritually just “getting by” and not accessing the power and protection within our reach? Are we satisfied with far less than the Lord is willing to give us, essentially opting to go it alone here rather than partner with the Divine?” (Sheri Dew, “We Are Not Alone” – Ensign, November 1998)

2 comments:

Brenda said...

This sounds like a great lesson - I look forward to teaching it!

TattingChic said...

That is a lovely lesson. :)